Special Issue on Scale Development in Tourism and Leisure Research: New Approaches, Theoretical and Methodological Issues

Journal of Business Research

 

 

Key Deadlines

Submissions Open: 31 August 2020

Submission Deadline: 15 Oct 2020

Final Acceptance Deadline: May 2021

 

Inquiries, including questions about appropriate topics, should be sent electronically to the guest editors:

 

Professor Sameer Hosany (Royal Holloway University of London, UK, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Professor Babak Taheri (Heriot-Watt University, UK, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Professor Albert G Assaf (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

See more here: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-business-research/call-for-papers/scale-development-in-tourism-and-leisure-research

 

Proper measurement of constructs is of utmost significance in behavioural and social sciences (Day & Montgomery, 1999) and represents an important field of enquiry (Lee & Hooley, 2005). Scales associate abstract concept(s) to empirical indicants according to particular rules and relevant overarching theory (Aiken, Bee, & Walker, 2018; Cools & Van den Broeck, 2007; De Vellis, 2017; Netemeyer, Bearden, & Sharma, 2003). A poorly conceived scale lead to inaccurate results and inferences. Tourism and leisure studies develop measures for a variety of constructs such as: compulsive sport consumption (Aiken, Bee, & Walker, 2018), festival gamification (Liu, Wang, Huang, & Tang, 2019), motivations to engage in drug tourism (Wen, Meng, Ying, QI, & Lockyer, 2018), backpacker identity (Chen, Zhao, & Huang, 2019), host sincerity (Taheri, Gannon, Cordina, & Lochrie, 2018), destination fascination (Liu, Wang, Huang, & Chen, 2017), leisure nostalgia (Cho, Pyun, & Wang, 2019), social capital in recreation and sport clubs (Forsell, Tower, & Polman, 2020), tourists’ emotional experiences (Hosany & Gilbert, 2010) and importance of social media sharing among tourists (Dedeoglu, Taheri, Okumus, & Gannon, 2020). Scale development practices have progressed over the past few decades, with new scales mainly following established theoretical and methodological guidelines (e.g., Churchill, 1979; De Vellis, 2017; Gerbing & Anderson, 1988; Netemeyer et al., 2003). Yet, limitations in application of start of the art practices (e.g., important steps being omitted) can still be identified in leisure and tourism studies (Hosany, Prayag, Deesilatham, Causevic, & Odeh 2015; Kock, Josiassen, & Assaf, 2019; Taheri et al., 2018) and in other disciplines such as sales and marketing (Hall and Lee, 2019), leadership studies (Crawford & Kelder, 2019), and behavioural sciences (MacKenzie, Podsakoff & Podsakoff, 2011). At the same time, the emergence of new methods and software offer opportunities to develop and employ new approaches. This special issue seeks contributions addressing theoretical and methodological issues as well as new approaches to scale development in tourism and leisure research.