Call for Papers

Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events

 

SPECIAL ISSUE

Tourism for sustainable development in developing countries

 

Guest Editors: Nicholas M. Odhiambo & Simplice A. Asongu, Department of Economics, University of South Africa.

 

The relationship between tourism and economic development has been a subject of intense debate in recent years. While some studies argue that tourism development is an important engine of economic growth and therefore it leads to economic development, other studies argue that it is economic development that drives the development of the tourism industry. Despite this controversy, tourism remains a critical ingredient for economic growth and development in many developing countries. It contributes directly to job creation, provides export revenue and leads to an increase in domestic value added. Hence, it has the potential to increase productivity and reduce poverty in developing countries. It is also featured in three of the seventeen (17) sustainable development goals (SDGs). It is estimated that the total exports generated from international tourism worldwide reached $1.6 trillion in 2017, which includes $1.3 trillion from international tourism receipts and $240 billion from international passenger transport services (see UNCTAD, 2018). In Africa, the direct travel and tourism employment in 2017 was estimated to have increased to 9.3 million (an 11.2% increase from 2016). Of these jobs, 2.5 million were reported in North Africa, while 6.8 million were reported in sub-Saharan Africa (see Africa Development Bank, 2018) In 2018, the total international tourist arrivals worldwide reached 1.4 billion representing an average increase of 6%. By regions, the Middle East recorded the highest growth (10%), followed by Africa (7%), Asia and the Pacific and Europe (6%) and the Americas (3%)  (see UNWTO, 2019).

 

Despite the increasing role of tourism in igniting economic growth and development, the dynamic relationship between tourism and economic development has not been fully explored in many developing countries, especially in African countries where many countries tend to rely on tourism for job creation and poverty reduction.

 

This special issue welcomes conceptual, theoretical and empirical papers that tackle issues pertaining to tourism for sustainable development in developing countries in the light of the post-2015 development agenda. Due to the undeniable devastating impact of the COVID-19 global pandemic on global tourism, which currently threatens approximately 120 million jobs worldwide with the total economic damage projected to exceed $1 trillion in 2020 (according to World Economic Forum, 2020), this issue also welcomes country-specific or regional studies that could shed some light on the impact of COVD-19 on the tourism sector in developing countries.

 

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

-       Tourism and economic growth

-       Tourism and poverty reduction

-       Tourism and exchange rate

-       Tourism and exports

-       Tourism and financial development

-       Tourism multiplier

-       Tourism and job creation

-       Tourism planning and management

-       Tourism infrastructure in developing countries

-       Tourism and environment (Environmental aspects of tourism)

-       Ecotourism

-       Leisure and culture

-       Tourism ecosystem

-       Tourism policy and governance

-       Socio-economic impact of tourism

-       Events and sports tourism

-       Tourism and COVID-19 global pandemic

 

Authors are invited to email Guest Editors using the email addresses below if they wish to explore whether potential papers would be within scope.

 

KEY DATES:

 

Submission of full papers: 15 April 2021

 

Feedback from reviewers: June 2021

 

Papers will be published online once they have been accepted (i.e. before being allocated to a volume/ issue).

 

 

About the Guest Editors:


1) Nicholas M. Odhiambo

Department of Economics, University of South Africa.

  1. O. Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria, South Africa.

Emails: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. /This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Nicholas Odhiambo (PhD) is Professor of Economics and Head of Macroeconomic Policy Analysis (MPA) Research Flagship Programme at the University of South Africa. He is currently one of the most published and cited economics authors not only in Africa but also internationally.


2) Simplice A. Asongu

Department of Economics, University of South Africa.

  1. O. Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria South Africa.

E-mails: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   , This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

SimpliceAsongu (PhD) is a Senior researcher at the University of South Africa. He is also the Lead economist and Director of the African Governance and Development Institute. He has a publication output of over 300 published and forthcoming scientific articles. He has previously guest-edited many special issues. He is also Associate Editor of many journals including, the: Journal of Economic Surveys, Journal of African Business and African Journal of Economic and Management Studies.

 

References

Africa Development Bank (2018). “Africa Tourism Monitor 2018 - The High 5s – Tourism as a Pathway to Industrialization, Integration, Quality of Life, Agriculture, and Powering Up Africa”, African Development Bank,

https://www.afdb.org/en/knowledge/publications/africa-tourism-monitor/.(Accessed: 28/10/2020).

 

UNCTAD (2018). “World Investment Report 2018”, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. https://unctad.org/webflyer/world-investment-report-2018 (Accessed: 28/10/2020).

 

UNWTO (2019). “World Tourism Organisation”,

http://www2.unwto.org/press-release/2019-01-21/international-tourist-arrivals-reach-14-billion-two-years-ahead-forecasts(Accessed: 20/01/2020).

 

World Economic Forum, (2020), “COVID-19 could set the global tourism industry back 20 years”

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/pandemic-covid19-tourism-sector-tourism/(Accessed: 28/10/2020).